Add Edible Flowers to Recipes

Add Edible Flowers to Recipes

Add new flavors and color to you cooking and salads with edible flowers. These varieties are easy to grow, will provide a nice splash of color to your garden or yard and will only cost you the price of seeds. If you’re a seed saver, then the next planting won’t cost you a penny.

There are countless flower varieties that you can use to liven-up your cooking and sprinkle color throughout your salads. Some of these include most herb and many vegetable flowers as well as what many consider landscaping flowers.

Petals Are Tastiest Part

While you can eat the entire bloom, there are some parts that are often bitter and not enjoyable to munch. Most of the white bases of petals aren’t that tasty. The center pistils and the stamens are often bitter. You can simply use the petals only if you don’t think you can avoid these parts, but generally, most chefs use the whole flower since these look the best as garnishes and edible flowers in dishes.

Use Organic Flowers Only

Since non-organic flowers may be laced with pesticides, I would never recommend using florist flowers or those sold in grocery stores, etc. Grow your own or purchase from an edible flower supplier. Yes, there really are such companies. Seeds are nominal in cost.

Edible Squash Plant Blossoms

There are many ways you can use these flowers, such as stuffing with an herb goat cheese. For years, I’d read about an Italian favorite recipe – fried squash blossoms. One summer, I decided to try flouring and frying these large blossoms. I didn’t really worry too much which squash bulbs were pollinated since I wasn’t using but a few blossoms. Besides, squash is such a prolific plant, I knew I wasn’t damaging the production processes.

Fried Blossoms

I used yellow crook neck squash blossoms, but zucchini blossoms are also a very popular choice. I floured the blossoms and dropped them one by one into hot oil. They quickly fried and were one of the most delicious squash tasting recipes I’ve ever made. You want to serve them immediately, so leave them as the very last preparation for your meal. It was a novelty and a surprise at the dinner table and my family loved these fried delights.

Violets

Violets bring a sweet taste to a salad or your favorite summer drink, like lemonade or an iced tea. You can crystalize violets by brushing with beaten egg white and then sprinkling with fine sugar. Once dried, you can garnish desserts with these fairy-like delectable wonders.

Hibiscus

If you’re looking for a flower that’s a mix of sweet and tart flavors, hibiscus falls in this category giving a light cranberry flavor. You may have enjoyed hibiscus tea. You can add real hibiscus flowers to your next tea time. If champagne is more your drink, it is truly deserving of a hibiscus bud that will open before your eyes.

Pansies

Need a mild minty flavor? Pansies to the rescue! This edible flower is ideal for summer fruit salads. You can use these beauties to garnish cakes as well.

Borage

The borage plant has long-time medicinal purposes and of course flavoring for various German, Italian and Polish recipes. It also has a beautiful and edible blue star-shaped flowers that are said to have a slight cucumber taste. This makes it a great choice for salads. You can also use it to garnish a tall glass of cold lemonade.

Lavender

These beautiful and sweet flowers are used in all kinds of recipes that include confections and homemade ice cream. Many people enjoy placing a few buds in champagne or other types of drinks.

Edible Flowers Fun and Unexpected

Using edible flowers in salads, drinks and desserts adds an elegant touch to your meals. It’s the small and simple details that elevate life into memorable moments.

 

photos: Marco Verch, stu_spivackJeffrey_Allen, wikimedia, pexels

 

 

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AuthorSally Painter

"Everyone can have a beautiful home decor. It just takes a little creativity," says author and freelance writer Sally Painter. This former commercial and residential designer is also a Feng Shui practitioner and believes that, "Everything you choose to put in your home should resonate with you emotionally. If it doesn't - get rid of it!"